Will you do eat-in dining with temperature checks, masks and gloves?

Yesterday @PorkyBelly linked to an article in the Los Angeles Times that outlined Gavin Newson’s set of policies to be enacted at restaurants once California’s stay-at-home orders are lifted, including taking customer temperatures at the door, requiring servers to wear masks and gloves, reducing the number of tables by 50% to increase physical distancing and providing disposable menus.

I’m kind of curious whether people would go out to eat under those circumstances. I know I would not as I feel it would be a real buzz kill to sit in a half-empty restaurant with my servers wearing gloves and masks and staring half-suspiciously at my unmasked (socially distanced) fellow diners and wondering exactly how far aerosols can travel and whether it truly is only 6 feet. I associate restaurant meals with conviviality and long leisurely meals over bottles of wine. Nothing about Governor Newsom’s plan sounds convivial. I’m not saying it’s not the right thing to do for public health as it probably is, but I think it is a further nail in the coffin of the restaurant industry.

Not sure how others feel, but for me, at most, I would dash in masked for some pick-up take-out and we all know restaurants with their high rent and thin margins cannot survive long-term on takeout.

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I’d rather take out and eat in my car.

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And that is the problem for the restaurant industry. Don’t think you will be ordering that apéritif and then, hey why not, that second bottle of wine, from your car. And even if you are not the kind of person who typically goes to a restaurant meal and orders pre-dinner drinks (or after-dinner drinks) and one or two bottles of wine, for fine dining, it is the diners who do who make the restaurant’s margins.

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it’s over

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For most restaurants, margins are thin as it is. If they can seat only half the tables, they’ll lose money. So I doubt many will do that.

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I disagree with none of your post. I hope they figure out how to adapt and survive.

Anyway you cut it though the short term is not looking great for the service industry.

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Get ready for the price hikes

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lol

Get ready for landlords to adjust rent or live with an unutlized property.

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we’re going back to the pop-up era.

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You can only raise prices if (a) people with disposable income who compromise the fine dining market are (i) still employed or still living large off their trust funds; and (ii) feel confident about spending money when it is unclear when the next catastrophe will strike. Moreover, even if people do have money to spend and enough money to feel confident about spending it, query whether they would actually be motivated to spend it dining in a half-empty restaurants with gloved and masked servers.

Not for me . Even if the meal was free . I would feel as if I was having dinner in the emergency room

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Not sure what your experience w/ commercial landlords have been, but my experience is that they’d rather leave the unit unoccupied then decrease the rent.

Regarding the topic… I’d be willing to consider it… But, as @robert mentioned, I also wonder if decreasing tables by 50% will enable to restaurants to survive .

Wonder if it will lead to a bifurcation where you have restaurants that are optimized for grab-and-go and other places that are super high-end (and can presumably survive w/ far fewer patrons per seating)?

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Wasn’t everybody on this site expecting this to be the new normal when restaurants opened back up? We aren’t going to be living like this forever (I hope). I’ll certainly be taking precautions but I’m going back to restaurants much faster than I’m going to a concert, sporting event, festival, food hall, museum, airport, etc… As others have mentioned if the capacity of restaurants goes down by 50% it won’t matter because we’ll have 25% of the choices we had in 2019.

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wouldn’t mind seeing how Vespertine rolls with this.

Kahn in full Darth Vader.

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Yes. Having these safety precautions is better than not having the option to dine at all.

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I’m thinking that food trucks and/or food courts will become more and more popular. Lower overhead.

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Too bad there’s not enough affordable land here to bring back the drive-in movie or a car hop restaurant.

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I feel like that was where we were headed anyway.

Like in Japan where real estate was getting crazy expensive it forced the market to shift towards going super small casual or super high end and only companies with large financial backing can open mid-sized and large sized restaurants.

I personally wouldn’t mind this future because instead of a few chefs concentrating power and building empires. You’d have alot of chefs actually working at their small places and being hands on everyday like in Japan.

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Or a true middle class… ::running and ducking::